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Denver, Colorado 80204

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Edward Marecak

Edward Marecak was born near Cleveland, Ohio. His professional art career began during his senior year in high school when he was hired by the National Youth Administration to document historic Ohio barns for 75 cents and hour.

 

He received a full scholarship to attend the Cleveland Institute of Art, on of the top art schools in the country, from 1938 to 1942. He then began to study at the seminal Cranbrook Academy of Art, following in the footsteps of such artists as Harry Bertoia, Charles Eames, and Eero Saarinen. His tie at Cranbrook was soon interrupted by World War II, during which he served in the U.S. Army in the Aleutian Islands.

 

 

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He returned to his education in 1946, spending a year at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center and the returning to Cranbrook in the fall of 1947 for one semester. He then chose to return to the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center to concentrate on lithography under Lawrence Barrett. During 1948 and 1949, he produced over a hundred lithographs with increasing skill.

 

In 1947, Marecak marred Theresa Madonna (Donna) Fortin, an artist in her own right. Donna Marecak grew into one of Colorado's most significant ceramicists.

 

From the fall of 1953 to the summer of 1955, Edward Marecak earned his teacher's certificate from the graduate program of the University of Denver. In 1957, he began a teaching career with the Denver Public Schools that would span the next 25 years and provide him with an income that would allow him to pursue and independent path in his art.

 

The diversity of Marecak's work is stunning and includes lithographs, monoprints, drawings, hooked rugs, ceramics, paintings wood sculptures, stained glass windows and jewelry. As a young boy, his Slovakian grandmother would entertain him with folk tales of magical beings, and while his work encompasses many subjects and styles, many included witches, spirits, fates, wilis, gods and goddesses found in fables, fairy tales and mythology.

 

 

 

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